Posts tagged International Yoga Da

Yoga for arthritis

Related imageYoga, t’ai chi, qi gong, and walking, are joining the treadmill and exercise bike as ways to safely and effectively increase physical activity. Keep in mind that yoga is not just represented by pretzel-like poses requiring considerable strength and balance. Beginner yoga classes may provide simple, gentle movements that gradually build strength, balance, and flexibility – all elements that may be especially beneficial for people with arthritis. In an article on Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, Steffany Haaz Moonaz, PhD and registered yoga teacher (RYT-500) will demystify yoga for arthritis patients and their providers. For her doctoral project, she worked with Dr. Susan Bartlett and Dr. Clifton Bingham in the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center to develop and test a modified yoga program for people living with arthritis. Click here to read the results of the study. We picked out some key questions that people living with arthritis may have before they start a yoga program.

What are the benefits of yoga?

Yoga is a safe and effective way to increase physical activity. Yoga can increase muscle strength, improve flexibility, enhance respiratory endurance, and promote balance. A recent study shows that yoga is associated with increased energy and fewer bodily aches and pains. Due to its meditative nature, yoga also benefits mental health by lessening feelings of anxiety, depression, and psychological stress.

Have scientific studies of yoga been done in arthritis patients?

Johns Hopkins has recently published an article with the results of a clinical trial of yoga that they have conducted in the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. The study provided “critical evidence showing that in people with arthritis who are sedentary, yoga appears to be safe, feasible, and enjoyable for people with both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and that it results in important physical and mental health benefits for people who practice it regularly.” Yoga programs developed as a follow up also found improvements in balance, functional reach, upper body function, and pain.

What is the best way to try yoga? 

Let your doctor know you are interested in doing yoga. Ask if there are any limitations or restrictions you should be aware of. Have your doctor write these recommendations so you can speak to a qualified yoga therapist or teacher and develop a yoga routine best suited to you. For the first few lessons, keep a mental note of how you feel during your yoga class. Are there positions that hurt? Are there modified methods for such positions?

What can I expect to do in a beginning yoga class?

There are three main components to most western yoga classes: poses (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayama), and relaxation. Some classes will include meditation or chanting. Remember, do not do anything that is uncomfortable. All yoga poses can be modified for your safety and comfort.

Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins 

Below is an excerpt from Johns Hopkins:

These are a few yoga poses that you may want to try at home.  Before beginning any new activity, be sure to consult your doctor.  It is important to listen to your body.  If you feel any sharp pain, instability or lightheadedness, stop and rest or adjust to a more comfortable position.  A well-trained and experienced yoga instructor will be able to offer more individual guidance to adapt the poses for your needs and limitations.