Monthly Archives: March 2017

What kind of flexible work arrangements would help workers with arthritis and why?

The latest issue of JointHealth™ insight explored arthritis in the workplace. The infographic below outlines what kind of flexible work arrangements would help workers with arthritis and why. infographic on work accommodations

infographic on work accommodations

 

 

Besides providing the work accommodations above, employers can also foster a healthy lifestyle at work, including:

1)Signing up employees for a sports team, such as softball, basketball, or water polo.

2)Investing in sit-stand desks for the office, allowing employees to alternate between standing and sitting, which helps to prevent back and joint pain.

3)Having a multipurpose space at work for employees to participate in stretching, yoga, and walking exercises.

4)Giving an exercise stipend to employees to participate in physical activities outside of work.

Frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s

Picture of person walking-feet onlyAccording to a recent study of physical activity as an experimental treatment for dementia, frequent, brisk walks are beneficial for people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease because walking bolsters physical abilities and slow memory loss.

The study aimed to investigate how and why exercise helps some people with dementia, but not others. There are 1.1 million Canadians who are directly or indirectly affected by dementia. Globally, the disease affects more than 35 million people, a number that is expected to double within 20 years. There are currently no reliable treatments for the disease.

Past studies which focused on how exercise can prevent Alzheimer’s disease have shown the following:

  • There is a strong correlation between regular exercise and improved memories in healthy elderly people.
  • Physical active older people are less likely than those who are sedentary to develop mild cognitive impairment (a common precursor to Alzheimer’s disease).
  • When compared to sedentary people of the same age, physically fit older people have more volume in their brain’s hippocampus, the portion of the brain most intimately linked to memory function.

For the current study, researchers from the University of Kansas decided to work with people who had been given a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Because the disease can affect coordination as it progresses, the study initially looked at men and women with early stage Alzheimer. Study participants had to be living at home and be able to safely walk by themselves or perform other types of light exercise.

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Exercise is Medicine® Canada – A global health initiative

Arthritis Broadcast Network, powered by Arthritis Consumer Experts, had the pleasure of interviewing Jonathon Fowles, Chair of the National Advisory Council: Exercise is Medicine® Canada, at the 2017 CRA Annual Scientific Meeting & AHPA Annual Meeting. Watch the interview to learn more about how exercise is medicine for people living with chronic diseases. Fowles is also a Professor at the School of Kinesiology at Acadia University.

If you have any questions for Fowles, please email the production team at:

feedback@jointhealth.org.

About Exercise is Medicine® Canada

Exercise is Medicine® Canada (EIMC) is a movement to encourage a healthy lifestyle among Canadians. EIMC programs are based on abundant evidence that physical activity and exercise reduce the risk of chronic disease and the belief that:

  • Most Canadians can find simple ways to incorporate physical activity and exercise into their daily routines;
  • More should be done to address physical activity and exercise in the healthcare setting; physical activity and exercise should be incorporated as a key health indicator and standard of medical care as a ‘vital sign’; and
  • Certified exercise professionals serve as important resources for Canadians and their healthcare providers

Exercise is Medicine® (EIM) is a global health initiative managed by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) that is focused on encouraging primary care physicians and other health care providers to include physical activity when designing treatment plans for patients and referring their patients to EIM Credentialied Exercise and Health Fitness Professionals. EIM is committed to the belief that physical activity is integral in the prevention and treatments of diseases and should be regularly assessed and “treated” as part of all healthcare. The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP) is the proud host organization for EIM in Canada.