Results of the Walk10Blocks study will be available soon.

Stay tuned!

About This Study

 

The Walk10Blocks app was designed to help people meet the basic daily exercise requirement. Research has shown that walking 10 blocks a day, about 1 km or 0.6 miles, may help delay or minimize risk of dementia and help improve cardiovascular and joint health over time. It was the first app designed specifically to help adults get off the couch, start walking and contribute to ground breaking research at the same time.

Walk10Blocks helped participants set reasonable walking goals and move from the couch to 10 blocks through motivating, friendly alerts. Based on data from their iPhone, the Walk10Blocks app tracked participants’ walking activity with easy-to-read measurements and recorded their important feedback to questionnaires.

By using the Walk10Blocks app, participants played an important role as partners in the research team from Arthritis Research Canada, Arthritis Consumer Experts, Alzheimer Society of B.C and Canadian Association of Retired Persons. The team is studying the benefits of walking for adults who are inactive, older and at risk for or struggling with arthritis or dementia.

 

Walk10Blocks Key Features

Dashboard

Dashboard

Viewer friendly dashboard that shows your walked blocks throughout each day.

Walking Goals

Walking Goals

Customizable daily walking goals

Notifications

Notifications

Stand up and take a walk reminders

Walking Log

Walking Log

A record of all your walks and how you rated them.

Badges

Badges

Fun rewards for meeting and beating your goals

Walk10Blocks Study Background Information

*Please note the Walk10Blocks study has ended. The information below is a historical record of the Walk10Blocks study.

For Canadians over 65, some of the leading causes of mobility limitation are chronic joint and muscle diseases and cognitive impairment most commonly caused by dementia such as Alzheimer’s Disease or Vascular Dementia.

Approximately 5 million Canadians are currently affected by some form of arthritis, a number that is estimated to grow to 7.5 million by 2036.

The World Health Organization reports that one new case of dementia is detected every 4 seconds.

Research suggests that walking a minimum of 1 kilometer, or about 10 city blocks per day, could reduce the risk of dementia, and potentially improve cardiovascular and bone health in the long term.

How The Study Worked

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*Please note the Walk10Blocks app study has ended. The information below is a historical record of the Walk10Blocks study. The Walk10Blocks team will be sharing the results of the study. Stay tuned!

We all know that walking is good for us, but understanding what motivates or supports people aged 30 to 50 years who are sedentary to include daily exercise into their lifestyles is vitally important as our population ages.

Using Apple’s ResearchKit platform, the Walk10Blocks study aimed to find out if there are differences in how participants used the app. Did they open or use the app regularly? Did they self-select reminder notifications to stand up and take breaks or go for a walk? Did they rate their walking experiences? Did they take the surveys, whether they are prompted or not?

It sounds simple, but the Walk10Blocks study was a complex research project that had the potential to provide answers on how to help people who are sedentary change their behavior, behavior that either has led to poorer health or puts them at risk of developing a health condition.

Ultimately, the findings of the Walk10Blocks study will guide the full development of the app and help future users move more and sit less.

The Walk10Blocks Team

Linda Li

Linda Li

BSc, PT, MSc, PhD

Primary Medical Consultant and Scientific Lead, Walk10Blocks and Professor at the University of British Columbia and Senior Scientist at Arthritis Research Canada

Teresa Liu-Ambrose

Teresa Liu-Ambrose

PhD, PT

Principal investigator of ICON, Canada Research Chair, Research Director, Falls Prevention Clinic, and Co-Site Lead for the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging, UBC Site

Jasmina Geldman

Jasmina Geldman

MSc

Research Coordinator, Walk10Blocks and Arthritis Research Canada

Lynne Feehan

Lynne Feehan

BScPT, MSc, PhD

Scientific advisor and Knowledge User Team Member, Walk10Blocks, and Clinical Research, Rehabilitation Program, Fraser Health, Surrey, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia

Alison Hoens

Alison Hoens

BScPT, MSc

Scientific advisor and Knowledge User Team Member, Walk10Blocks and Physical Therapy Knowledge Broker at UBC Department of Physical Therapy

Cheryl Koehn

Cheryl Koehn

President of Arthritis Consumer Experts

Knowledge User Team Lead, Walk10Blocks, Founder and President of Arthritis Consumer Experts, ICON partner organization representative

Eva Boberski

Eva Boberski

BSN, MPH

Knowledge User Team Member, Walk10Blocks, Manager and Research Coordinator at Alzheimer Society of B.C., ICON partner organization representative

Ana Hall

Ana Hall

BSc, MPH

Knowledge User Team Member, Walk10Blocks and National Volunteers and Events Manager at Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP)

Andrés Fajardo

Andrés Fajardo

CompSci, MDM

Technical Lead and Product and Project Manager, Walk10Blocks and independent consultant on development of digital products

Anita Chan

Anita Chan

BA

Project Administration Lead, Walk10Blocks and JointHealth Program Coordinator

Patricia Nunez

Patricia Nunez

BFA, MDM

Graphic and UI Designer, Walk10Blocks

The Walk10Blocks app on the Research Kit platform can help conduct important research that may provide answers on how we and help delay dementia and improve cardiovascular and joint health over time.

– Dr. Linda Li, PT,
PhD of Physical Therapy

University of British Columbia
Principle Investigator of Icon

We believe that giving individuals the tools to motivate them to move and track their health is incredibly powerful.

– Cheryl Koehn, President
Arthritis Consumer Experts
Icon Knowledge User Team Lead

News

Yoga for arthritis

Related imageYoga, t’ai chi, qi gong, and walking, are joining the treadmill and exercise bike as ways to safely and effectively increase physical activity. Keep in mind that yoga is not just represented by pretzel-like poses requiring considerable strength and balance. Beginner yoga classes may provide simple, gentle movements that gradually build strength, balance, and flexibility – all elements that may be especially beneficial for people with arthritis. In an article on Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, Steffany Haaz Moonaz, PhD and registered yoga teacher (RYT-500) will demystify yoga for arthritis patients and their providers. For her doctoral project, she worked with Dr. Susan Bartlett and Dr. Clifton Bingham in the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center to develop and test a modified yoga program for people living with arthritis. Click here to read the results of the study. We picked out some key questions that people living with arthritis may have before they start a yoga program.

What are the benefits of yoga?

Yoga is a safe and effective way to increase physical activity. Yoga can increase muscle strength, improve flexibility, enhance respiratory endurance, and promote balance. A recent study shows that yoga is associated with increased energy and fewer bodily aches and pains. Due to its meditative nature, yoga also benefits mental health by lessening feelings of anxiety, depression, and psychological stress.

Have scientific studies of yoga been done in arthritis patients?

Johns Hopkins has recently published an article with the results of a clinical trial of yoga that they have conducted in the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center. The study provided “critical evidence showing that in people with arthritis who are sedentary, yoga appears to be safe, feasible, and enjoyable for people with both rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and that it results in important physical and mental health benefits for people who practice it regularly.” Yoga programs developed as a follow up also found improvements in balance, functional reach, upper body function, and pain.

What is the best way to try yoga? 

Let your doctor know you are interested in doing yoga. Ask if there are any limitations or restrictions you should be aware of. Have your doctor write these recommendations so you can speak to a qualified yoga therapist or teacher and develop a yoga routine best suited to you. For the first few lessons, keep a mental note of how you feel during your yoga class. Are there positions that hurt? Are there modified methods for such positions?

What can I expect to do in a beginning yoga class?

There are three main components to most western yoga classes: poses (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayama), and relaxation. Some classes will include meditation or chanting. Remember, do not do anything that is uncomfortable. All yoga poses can be modified for your safety and comfort.

Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins 

Below is an excerpt from Johns Hopkins:

These are a few yoga poses that you may want to try at home.  Before beginning any new activity, be sure to consult your doctor.  It is important to listen to your body.  If you feel any sharp pain, instability or lightheadedness, stop and rest or adjust to a more comfortable position.  A well-trained and experienced yoga instructor will be able to offer more individual guidance to adapt the poses for your needs and limitations.

Collage of people doing exercise

Exercise gives you endorphins, the happy hormones

Collage of people doing exerciseSpring is nearly upon us! It’s time to dust off that bicycle and basketball of yours and do some exercises. If your location is experiencing the last of a cold spell, consider going to a community centre or gym to get some exercises. In a series of post called “Being active is good for the brain”, Dr. Scott Lear says that when we exercise, our body releases hormones called endorphins – the happy hormones. After exercising, endorphins are released, giving you a euphoric feeling – or in the running world, the runner’s high. Did you know that this euphoric feeling can also be felt with low levels of activity?

Research literature supports a link between exercise and increased positive mood, reduced depression and anxiety, and greater well-being. In research studies, those who reported higher psychological well-being exercised more frequently than those with lower psychological well-being. Exercise also helped with stress management. In “The cascade of positive events: Does exercise on a given day increase the frequency of additional positive events?“, the authors said that “exercise might be categorized as a positive event within the context of an individual’s day-to-day life”.

Dr. Lear added, “The benefits of exercise appear to be even greater the worse our mood is prior to exercising.” He’s had some of the best workouts when he releases stress by going for a swim or bike ride. Exercise can also improve memory and cognition, helping you think better and in turn, achieve more. According to this New York Times article, going for a post-meal walk, as short as 15 minutes, can help with digestion and improve blood sugar levels in people with Type 2 diabetes. For people with depression, exercise is a proven therapy to reduce depressive symptoms.

In conclusion, exercise improves memory and cognition and leads to an increase in BNDF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) – low levels of BNDF are associated with greater risk of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Studies in people with dementia have not shown improvements in cognition and symptoms with exercise. However, there was an improvement in the ability of people with dementia to perform day-to-day activities such as getting dressed and bathing, which help to prolong independent living. Though exercise improves a number of risk factors associated with dementia such as high blood pressure and diabetes, researchers agree more studies need to be conducted about the relationship between exercise and dementia.

Given the benefits of exercise, let’s take baby steps and start by taking the stairs and going for a walk after lunch! Happy exercising!

Walk10Blocks App Study – Participant Survey

We are inviting you to complete a short survey on your experiences with the Walk10Blocks app study.

Walk10Blocks Research Participant Survey Banner

Dear Walk10Blocks app study participant,

We are contacting you because you consented to participate in our walking app feasibility study. We are inviting you to complete a short survey on your experiences with the Walk10Blocks app study. The survey will take less than five minutes to complete.

All information collected during this survey will only be accessed by the Walk10Blocks research team based on the university of British Columbia. The data will be used for improving the Walk10Blocks app. If you have any questions or need additional information about the study, our North American contact is walk10blocks@arthritisresearch.ca.

Thank you!

The Walk10Blocks Research Team

Contact Us

You may contact us through any of the following:

O 604 974 1366
m Arthritis Consumer Experts

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Independent Contact:

If you are not satisfied with how this study is being conducted, if you have questions about your rights as a research participant or if you have questions, concerns, input, or complaints about the research, please contact Arthritis Research Canada to speak to a Knowledge User:

Arthritis Research Canada

5591 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC  V6X2C7

T: 604-207-4020 I F: 604-207-4059
E-mail: lli@arthritisresearch.ca

The Walk10Blocks app was developed in a partnership between Improving Cognitive and Joint Health Network, The University of British Columbia, Arthritis Consumer ExpertsArthritis Research CanadaAlzheimers Society of BC, and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.

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